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Cabernet Franc

Cabernet Franc is one of the major black grape varieties worldwide. It is principally grown for blending with Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot in the Bordeaux style, but can also be vinified alone - as in the Loire's Chinon. In addition to being used in blends and produced as a varietal in Canada and the United States it is made into ice wine there. Cabernet Franc is lighter than Cabernet Sauvignon,[1] making a bright pale red wine[2] and contributing finesse and a peppery perfume to blends with more robust grapes. Depending on growing region and style of wine, additional aromas can include tobacco, raspberry, bell pepper, and cassis, sometimes even violets. Records of Cabernet Franc in Bordeaux go back to the end of the 18th century; it was planted in Loire long before that. DNA analysis indicates Cabernet Franc is one of two parents of Cabernet Sauvignon, a cross between it and Sauvignon Blanc.[3]


Cabernet Franc

Catawba Grapes

Catawba is a red American grape variety used for wine as well as juice, jams and jellies. The grape can have a pronounced musky or "foxy" flavor.

Catawba played an important role in the early history of American wine. During the early to mid-19th century, it was the most widely planted grape variety in the country and was the grape behind Nicholas Longworth's acclaimed Ohio sparkling wines that were distributed as far away as California and Europe.


Catawba Grapes

Cayuga White

Cayuga White is a wine grape was developed from crosses of the hybrids Schuyler and Seyval Blanc done at Cornell University's New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. It is a hardy vine with some bunch-rot disease resistance. It should be picked at low sugars to avoid over-ripe, sometimes labrusca-like, flavors. Picked at the proper time it can produce a very nice sparkling wine with good acid balance, structure, and pleasant aromas or a fruity white wine similar to a Riesling.
Cayuga White

Concord

Concord grapes are a cultivar derived from the grape species Vitis labrusca (a.k.a. fox grape) which are used as table grapes, wine grapes and juice grapes.

The Concord grape was developed in 1849 by Ephraim Wales Bull in Concord, Massachusetts. Bull planted seeds from wild Vitis labrusca and evaluated over 22,000 seedlings before finding what he considered the perfect grape, the original vine of which still grows at his former home. The pollen parent is unknown. Although Concord is frequently considered to be basically a Vitis labrusca cultivar, some have argued that the hermaphrodite flowers suggest at least a small amount of Vitis vinifera in its pedigree. This trait has not been proven to exist in any native American grapes. However, Concord is definitely much more labrusca-like in its characteristics than vinifera-like. Many consider the likely male parent to have been Catawba, itself probably half Vitis labrusca, which Bull had growing nearby.


Concord

DeChaunac

De Chaunac is a French-American hybrid wine grape variety used to make red wines. It was developed by Albert Seibel circa 1860. It is also known as Seibel 9549 and is a cross of Seibel 5163 and possibly Seibel 793. The grape was named after Adhemar de Chaunac, a pioneer in the Ontario wine industry.[1] De Chaunac is known to have a very vigorous growth habit and good resistance to powdery mildew and downy mildew. It is grown in varying amounts for wine production across the northeastern side of North America, especially in the winegrowing regions of New York, Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Michigan, and other northeastern wine growing areas.


DeChaunac

Frontenac

Frontenac is a vinifera hybrid grapevine that is a result of research and cross-breeding by the University of Minnesota. It was grown from a crossing of the complex interspecific hybrid Landot 4511 and a very cold hardy selection of Vitis riparia. It was released in 1996.
Frontenac

Marechal Foch

Marechal Foch (pronounced "mar-esh-shall-fosh"), is an inter-specific hybrid red wine grape variety. The quality of wine produced by Marechal Foch vines is highly dependent upon vine age, and the flavor profile associated with many new-world hybrid varietals is much reduced in examples made with fruit picked from older vines. The berry size of this variety is small.

In southern Ontario and the northeastern United States, Marechal Foch ripens fully by the end of September. The area in Canada, however is much reduced from previous plantings due to an extensive vine-pull program in the early 1980s designed to replace Foch and other hybrids with Vitis vinifera varietals. Tragically, much of the remaining old vines Marechal Foch currently planted are used to make inexpensive, and often artificially sweetened "jug wines". One of the few remaining "Old Vines" Foch plants are grown by Lang Vineyards in the Okanagan Valley. The grapes have been on the property for over 50 years. After a short "restructuring" the winery is once again producing high quality Marechal Foch wines from its old vineyards. Vancouver Island is another Foch wine region with high quality wines being produced in select pockets. Muse Winery has been growing Marechal Foch for 10 years now. These wines exhibit the dark, inky styles preferred by Foch lovers. Pairs well with chocolate!

Marechal Foch

Niagara

The Niagara grape was created in Niagara County, New York in 1868. They are a cross of Concord and Cassady grapes.
Niagara

Teroldego

Teroldego is a deeply colored red-wine grape grown in the Trentino-Alto Adige wine region of northern Italy. There is just one DOC for varietal Teroldego wines (Teroldego Rotaliano) in its native Italy, and the variety is hardly cultivated anywhere else in the world.

The variety produces deeply pigmented red wines with an intensely fruity characteristic, a style that has become something of an icon for Trentino's wine industry. Although Teroldego wine is rarely "fine", it is soft-styled and needs very little aging to make it palatable. While it is usually drunk within three years of bottling, it can age well for up to 10 years. In blends, it adds color, and is planted in Tuscany and Veneto for this purpose

 

The grapes ripen around the last week of September or the first week of October.

Teroldego

Traminette

Traminette is a cross of the French American hybrid Joannes Seyve 23.416 and the German Vitis vinifera cultivar Gewürztraminer made by Herb C. Barrett ca. 1965 at the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign. His intention was to produce a large clustered table grape with the flavor of Gewürztraminer. He sent the cross to the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station grape breeding program at Cornell for development when he departed from Illinois. Traminette was found to have excellent wine quality, combined with good productivity, partial resistance to several fungal diseases, and cold hardiness superior to its acclaimed parent, Gewürztraminer, while retaining a similar character.


Traminette

Vidal Blanc

Vidal Blanc is an inter-specific hybrid variety of white wine grape, a cross of Ugni Blanc and Rayon d'Or (Seibel 4986). It manages to produce high sugar levels in cold climates while maintaining good acid levels. Vidal Blanc was developed in the 1930s by French breeder Jean Louis Vidal; his primary goal in developing the variety was to produce vines suitable for the production of Cognac in the Charente region of France. However, due to its winter hardiness this grape variety is cultivated most extensively in Canada and in the north-eastern United States. It is somewhat resistant to powdery mildew. The wine produced from Vidal Blanc is fruity, with grapefruit and pineapple notes. Due to its high acidity and fruitiness it is particularly suited to sweeter, dessert wines. In particular, because of the tough outer skin of the fruit, it is well adapted for the production of ice wine, especially in Ontario and the Great Lakes region of the United States.
Vidal Blanc